Implicit or unconscious bias is a form of bias that occurs automatically and unintentionally, that nevertheless affects judgments, decisions, and behaviors. Research has shown implicit bias can pose a barrier to recruiting and retaining a diverse scientific workforce.

The good news is that implicit bias can be mitigated with awareness and effective bias-reduction strategies. We provide a few examples of these strategies that you can use to reduce implicit bias.

Understanding your implicit bias

Proceedings of the Diversity and Inclusion Innovation Forum: Unconscious Bias in Academic Medicine

Proceedings of the Diversity and Inclusion Innovation Forum: Unconscious Bias in Academic Medicine is an insightful look into both the understanding of the benefits of diversity and inclusion, as well as a summary of potential interventions to remediate the biases present in modern academic medicine.

Developed by the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, along with input from national experts.

Proceedings of the Diversity

Harvard Project Implict

Harvard Project Implicit, a multi-university research—a collaboration launched in 1998 by three scientists: Tony Greenwald (University of Washington), Mahzarin Banaji (Harvard University), and Brian Nosek (University of Virginia)—supports on-going research on implicit bias, disseminates research findings, and translates the scientific research into actionable individual and organizational practices aimed at reducing the impact of implicit bias.

Take one of the 14 publicly accessible Implicit Association Tests. There’s no need to register or login! Each test takes less than five minutes and will give you results.

Take the test